Job Loss; What Are The Top Reasons? 

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With Covid 19, many people across the world lost their jobs: Well, talking about job loss in America, what were the real reasons? A research from PEW Centre said that low pay, lack of opportunities for advancement and feeling disrespected at work are the top reasons why Americans quit their jobs last year.

In the survey, the PEW said that 63 per cent of workers who quit a job in 2021 attributed it to low pay and no opportunities for advancement. Apart from this, 57 per cent felt disrespected at work as reason for quitting.

WAS CHILD CARE A REASON?

Most of the people surveyed did not mention child care as a major reason for quitting their job. Only 48 per cent among those with a child younger than 18 in the household said it was reason. A similar share point to a lack of flexibility to choose when they put in their hours (45%) or not having good benefits such as health insurance and paid time off (43%). Roughly, a quarter say each of these was a major reason

WHAT ABOUT WORKING SEVERAL HOURS?

About four-in-ten adults who quit a job last year say that they were working too many hours. However, three-in-ten cite working too few hours for quitting the job. About a third (35%) cite wanting to relocate to a different area, while relatively few (18%) cite their employer requiring a COVID-19 vaccine as a reason.

COVID PANDEMIC AND JOB?

About 31 per cent of the people surveyed that their reasons for quitting a job was related to the coronavirus outbreak. This was quite evident among people with a four-year college degree (34%) and lesser with a bachelor’s degree or more education (21%)

Among adults who quit a job in 2021, those without a four-year college degree are more likely than those with at least a bachelor’s degree to point to several reasons. These include not having enough flexibility to decide when they put in their hours (49% of non-college graduates vs. 34% of college graduates), having to work too few hours (35% vs. 17%) and their employer requiring a COVID-19 vaccine (21% vs. 8%).

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Non-White adults who quit a job last year are more likely than their white counterparts to say the reasons include not having enough flexibility (52% vs. 38%), wanting to relocate to a different area (41% vs. 30%), working too few hours (37% vs. 24%) or their employer requiring that they have a COVID-19 vaccine (27% vs. 10%). The non-White category includes those who identify as Black, Asian, Hispanic, some other race or multiple races. These groups could not be analyzed separately due to sample size limitations.

NEW JOBS AND IMPROVEMENTS

The report also mentioned that those who quit and are now employed elsewhere are more likely than not to say their current job has better pay, more opportunities for advancement and more work-life balance and flexibility. The PEW Centre found that 61 per cent of the people who participated in the survey opined that it was somewhat easy for them to find their current job, with 33% saying it was very easy. One-in-five say it was very or somewhat difficult, and 19% say it was neither easy nor difficult.

The PEW Centre said that 56 per cent of the surveyed people noted that they earned more money than their previous job. It said that 53 per cent had more opportunities for advancement and had an easier time balancing work and family responsibilities.

Still, sizable shares say things are either worse or unchanged in these areas compared with their last job. Fewer than half of workers who quit a job last year (42%) say they now have better benefits, such as health insurance and paid time off, while a similar share (36%) says it’s about the same. About one-in-five (22%) now say their current benefits are worse than at their last job

YOUNGER ADULTS

About one-in-five non-retired U.S. adults (19%) – including similar shares of men (18%) and women (20%) – say they quit a job at some point in 2021, meaning they left by choice and not because they were fired, laid off or because a temporary job had ended.

Adults younger than 30 are far more likely than older adults to have voluntarily left their job last year: 37% of young adults say they did this compared with 17% of those ages 30 to 49,9% of those ages 50 to 64 and 5% of those ages 65 and older.

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